Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Interview with Amy Roloff about the kids and teen issues

"Celebrity Baby Scoop" has an interview with Amy Roloff. Some of it are the basics that loyal fans have heard many times, their goal for doing the show, etc.; there is some information about her charity events upcoming . She also was asked about each of the kids. It's always interesting to get Amy's perspective on the kids. I believe this is the first time Amy is asked how she approaches teen issues such as "safe drinking, drugs and safe sex".

http://celebritybabyscoop.com/2010/05/18/amy-roloff-we-are-not-just-surviving-we-are-thriving

CBS: Tell us about your 16-year-old daughter Molly. How does she make out in a house full of boys?

AR: "She holds her own and I think the boys really look up to her and rely on her especially when I'm away for speaking engagements, business and my charity foundation. She is the balance and stabilizer in our family. She is a growing into a wonderful young independent woman. She does like it when I'm home so that makes me feel good too. She is doing wonderful in school, loves hanging out with friends (what teenager doesn't?!), plays volleyball, reads a lot and has a little spontaneity."

CBS: How is your 13-year-old son Jacob doing after his accident? Have you noticed any changes in him since the serious incident?


AR: "Jacob is a typical 13-year-old teenager in personality. He is bright, does well in school, gets bored, loves the computer “techy” world, games, loves to horse around with this brothers and friends, plays soccer, a little martial arts, but is sometimes stubborn and not talkative. The typical 'What does Mom know' attitude that most young teenagers embrace during their awkward stages of life is what he is going through as he finds himself and discovers more about himself and others.

I think he is doing well after the accident physically and mentally. He didn't really want to go near the trubechet for months afterward but he got back in the saddle and worked a little on the next one - that is still in progress. We had a good family friend pass away and that may be have been a bigger affect on Jacob's life, for all of my kids. But he is doing good."

CBS: Your twin boys - Zachary and Jeremy - are about to turn 20! What are the plans as the boys enter young adulthood? Moving out of the house? College? Girlfriends?

AR: "Both Jeremy and Zachary are enjoying life. They are going to a local community college and the plan is to transfer to a college/university. So they have more schooling to go. Right now they are still living at home but have begun to look beyond that to see what it would take to get a job, have a car, move out, school. They are keeping busy and still playing a little soccer. No girlfriends right now. They are enjoying the time with friends."

CBS: While one of the twins (Zack) was born with achondroplasia like you, the other (Jeremy) was not. In fact, Jeremy is quite tall at 6'1! How have you approached their differences and helped them celebrate who they are?

AR: "Their difference is their 'normal.' So for the most part the boys have done quite well. There personalities are defiantly different as well. They are two individuals and we have tried to help them appreciate themselves and do their best for who they are while still appreciating the other. Sure they have their frustrations but they often come back together too."


CBS: How did you and Matt address his DUI with the kids? What do you teach them about safe drinking? Drugs? How about safe sex?

AR: "As the kids have grown up, I have been pretty upfront with them in letting them know information on all sorts of areas, including drinking and safe sex. To me information is knowledge and that is powerful. I can't be there with them all of the time and regardless of what others do this is when they need to think of themselves and what they need to do, their behavior and about making choices and consequences from those choices - positive and negative. Parents aren't perfect either, including us, and so we talk about it."

You can read the full interview on their website:

http://celebritybabyscoop.com/2010/05/18/amy-roloff-we-are-not-just-surviving-we-are-thriving

8 comments:

Abby said...

FYI: There is no way Jeremy is 6'1". I've met Jeremy. My brother is 6'1". I need to look upwards at him. Jeremy was more on my level. I would guess Jeremy's true height as being around 5'10".

Dana said...

I hope some people pay very close attention to how both Matt and Amy talk about Jacob when they are asked about them. They try their best to highlight positives as any parents do, but if you read their answers carefully, it is different than how they talk about the twins and Molly. He has behaviorial issues. When people comment on it we are being more aware than some other people who always defend him.

Craw said...

Finally! Now some people can drop it. Notice she did not say that Jeremy doesn't drink or that he doesn't have sex. The question was about safe drinking and a safe sex.

Jeremy is a completely normal popular guy no matter what image people or TLC want to slap on him.

Brandon said...

"Right now they are still living at home but have begun to look beyond that to see what it would take to get a job, have a car, move out, school. They are keeping busy and still playing a little soccer. No girlfriends right now. They are enjoying the time with friends."
=====================

By having a car, she must mean actually paying for it themselves and being responsible for it because they obviously have their own cars (lots of them) right now and have had since they were 16.

How sad. They are 20 and just beginning to think about what it would be like to get a job and move out?

I'm not being sarcastic, but seriously what she described is more on the par for most 15 year olds, not 20 years old. Begin thinking about what it would be like to actually work, while living at home and spending your days with your friends playing soccer while those "grown up" things are just ideas that you begin to ponder.

Geesh.

Brandon said...

Dana, for once I partly agree with you but for a different reason. It's not a good thing, but yes, I have noticed the subtle differences in how Matt and Amy talk about Jacob. They have called him their most challenging child after all.

Jeremy is in the National Enquirer for using bigoted language, but Jacob is their most challenging child. Jeremy was the one stealing Matt's vodka and almost burning down their barns, but Jacob is the most challenging kid?

The biggest thing I notice is how they don't mind mentioning the negative with Jacob, but they don't for the others (in Molly's case they are probably being truthful!) Do they ever mention Jeremy's faults or areas he needs to work on? No...

Taylor! said...

I'm fifteen and I've had a job for about a year now. Jeremy and Zach are 20 and they've only worked on their farm...(well Zach just got a job at some soccer place) I'm already saving up to buy a car of my own so i dont have to rely on my parents.
But i guess when your parents are rich and you're on a tv show you dont have to worry about all that...
I personaly think its kinda pathetic...

Cindy said...

Taylor, I am so glad to hear a person your age say that. You're doing it the right way, developing work ethic and character.

There have been a lot said about how the Roloffs have changed, but I've always felt they started going in the wrong direction when they didn't make Jeremy and Zach get regular part time jobs when they were sixteen.

Amy is fond of saying "TV follows us, we don't follow TV" but that is an example of how it wasn't true.

Alfred said...

Why are people so jealous of the Roloff kids?

Just because their parents bought them cars, or didn't kick them out of the house at 20 years old, that is not a bad thing.

The parents have the resources to do that for their children and they are doing so.

My wife and I also bought a car for our child, it's not as uncommon as some of you may think.